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Corona update: US surpasses the grim milestone of 100,000 deaths; total tally jumps to 1.7 Million

Story Highlights
  • On Thursday, More than 5.6 million cases of Covid-19 have been reported worldwide
  • As per Johns Hopkins University data, In USA, 100,411 deaths reported as of Thursday Morning
  • an average of nearly 900 Americans have died every day from Covid-19

Washington: The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 has reached a gruesome milestone as of Thursday afternoon, the highly contagious virus has taken more than 100,000 lives nationwide.

According to Johns Hopkins University figures, The United States has reported 1,00,047 deaths, representing more than 28% of the global death toll from the pandemic.

No one knew how bad coronavirus pandemic would get when the first known virus-related death happened on February 6. It took less than 4 months to reach this bleak milestone. But since then, an average of nearly 900 Americans have died every day from Covid-19

The majority of those deaths have come in clusters on the nation’s east coast, with the states of New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Michigan and Pennsylvania making up over half of the death toll. New York state has recorded more than 29,000 deaths alone.

About 6% of the nearly 1.7 million people who have tested positive for the coronavirus in the U.S. have succumbed to the disease.

The US not only has the highest number of deaths registered on its name but also it tops the chart of worst hit countries in the world. With 1.7 Million people infected from this disease in the US, this is roughly four times more than the next most severely hit country, Brazil.

With US lifting lockdown and all 50 states now separately dropping some or all of their social distancing restrictions, health experts warn that the U.S. coronavirus death toll could climb much higher than the approximately 140,000 by August that many of them have been predicting.

Meanwhile, More than 5.6 million cases of Covid-19 have been reported worldwide, as well as at least 354,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

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